Stub.png
Cup stub
This article about UEFA Euro 2000 is a stub, an article too short to provide more than rudimentary information about a subject. You can help The Football Wiki by expanding it.
UEFA European Championships
UEFA Euro 2000
Tournament details
Host countries Belgium
 Netherlands
Dates10 June – 1 July
Teams16
Venue(s)(in 8 host cities)
Final positions
Champions France (2nd title)
Runner-up Italy
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored85 (2.74 per match)
Attendance1,122,833 (36,220 per match)
Top scorer(s)Flag of Netherlands Patrick Kluivert
Flag of FR Yugoslavia Savo Milošević
(5 goals each)
Best playerFlag of France Zinedine Zidane
1996
2004

The 2000 UEFA European Football Championship, also known as Euro 2000, was the 11th UEFA European Football Championship, which is held every four years and organised by UEFA, association football's governing body in Europe.

The finals of Euro 2000 were co-hosted (the first time this happened) by Belgium and the Netherlands, between 10 June and 2 July 2000. Spain and Austria also bid to host the event. The final tournament was contested by 16 nations. With the exception of the national teams of the hosts, Belgium and the Netherlands, the finalists had to go through a qualifying round to reach the final stage. France won the tournament, by defeating Italy 2–1 in the final, via a golden goal.

The finals saw the first major UEFA competition contested in the King Baudouin Stadium (formerly the Heysel Stadium) since the events of the 1985 European Cup Final and the Heysel Stadium disaster, with the opening game being played in the rebuilt stadium.

Summary

One of the biggest surprises of the tournament was Portugal, winning Group A with three wins, including a 3–0 win against Germany, with Sérgio Conceição scoring a hat-trick, and a 3–2 win over England, in which they came back from 2–0 down. Romania was the other qualifier from the group, beating England with a late penalty in their last group game.

Belgium had a surprise exit in the group stage, winning the tournament's first game against Sweden, but losing to Turkey and Italy. They finished third in Group B, behind Italy and Turkey. The other co-host and favourite, the Netherlands, progressed as expected from Group D, along with World Cup winners France. The Netherlands won the group, by beating France in their last group match. Also in Group D, Denmark's three losses with eight goals conceded and none scored set a new record for the worse team performance in the group stages of a Euros. Group C was memorable for the match between Yugoslavia and Spain. Spain needed a win to ensure progression, but found themselves trailing 3–2, after Slobodan Komljenović scored in the 75th minute. The Spanish side rescued their tournament by scoring twice in injury time to record a 4–3 victory. Yugoslavia managed to go through as well, despite losing because Norway and Slovenia played to a draw.

Italy and Portugal maintained their perfect records in the quarter-finals, beating Romania and Turkey, respectively, and the Netherlands started a goal-avalanche against Yugoslavia, winning 6–1. Spain fell 2–1 to France; Raul missed a late penalty that ended Spanish hopes.

Italy eliminated the Netherlands in the semi-finals, despite going down to ten men and facing two penalty kicks. Italian goalkeeper Francesco Toldo, who had been drafted into the starting XI as Gianluigi Buffon missed the tournament through injury, made two saves in the penalty shootout (in addition to his penalty save in normal time) to carry the Italians to the final.

In the other semi-final, Portugal lost in extra time to France after Zinedine Zidane converted a controversial penalty kick. Several Portuguese players challenged the awarding of the penalty for a handball and were given lengthy suspensions for shoving the referee. France won the tournament, defeating Italy 2–1 in the final with a golden goal by David Trezeguet after equalising with a last-minute goal, and became the first team to win the European championship while being world champion.

In Britain, Match of the Day named Stefano Fiore's goal against Belgium the Goal of the Tournament, ahead of Patrick Kluivert's against France and Zinedine Zidane's against Spain.

Qualification

Main article: UEFA Euro 2000 qualifying

Qualification for the tournament took place throughout 1998 and 1999. Forty-nine teams were divided into nine groups and each played the others in their group, on a home-and-away basis. The winner of each group and the best runner-up qualified automatically for the final tournament. The eight other runners-up played an additional set of play-off matches to determine the last four qualifiers. Belgium and the Netherlands automatically qualified for the tournament as co-hosts.

Qualified teams

The following 16 teams participated in the tournament:

Country Qualified as Date qualification was secured Previous appearances in tournament1
 Belgium 00Co-hosts 18 January 1998 3 (1972, 1980, 1984)
 Netherlands 01Co-hosts 18 January 1998 5 (1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996)
 Italy 02Group 1 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1996)
 Norway 03Group 2 winner 9 October 1999 0 (debut)
 Germany4 04Group 3 winner 9 October 1999 7 (1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996)
 France 05Group 4 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960, 1984, 1992, 1996)
 Sweden 06Group 5 winner 9 October 1999 1 (1992)
 Spain 07Group 6 winner 10 October 1999 5 (1964, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996)
 Romania 08Group 7 winner 9 October 1999 2 (1984, 1996)
 FR Yugoslavia3 10Group 8 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960, 1968, 1976, 1984)
 Czech Republic2 11Group 9 winner 9 October 1999 4 (1960, 1976, 1980, 1996)
 Portugal 12Best runner-up 9 October 1999 2 (1984, 1996)
 Denmark 13Play-offs 17 November 1999 5 (1964, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996)
 England 14Play-offs 17 November 1999 5 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996)
 Slovenia 15Play-offs 17 November 1999 0 (debut)
 Turkey 16Play-offs 17 November 1999 1 (1996)
1 Bold indicates champion for that year; Italic indicates host for that year
2 as Czechoslovakia before 1996
3 as SFR Yugoslavia before 2000 (qualified in 1992 but was banned by UN from all international sport.)
4 as West Germany before 1992

Seeding

The composition of pots 1 to 3 was based on the teams' UEFA coefficient at the end of 1999. The finals draw took place on 12 December 1999.

Seeded Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3


External links

UEFA Euro 2000
Stages

Group A · Group B · Group C · Group D · Group E · Group F · Knockout phase · Final

General information

Bids · Matches · Statistics · Squads · Qualification

UEFA Euro 2000 stadiums
Belgium
Jan Breydel Stadium (Bruges) · King Baudouin Stadium (Brussels) · Stade du Pays de Charleroi (Charleroi) · Stade Maurice Dufrasne (Liège)
Netherlands
Johan Cruyff Arena (Amsterdam) · GelreDome (Arnhem) · Philips Stadion (Eindhoven) · Feijenoord Stadion (Rotterdam)
UEFA European Championship
Tournaments
France 1960 · Spain 1964 · Italy 1968 · Belgium 1972 · Yugoslavia 1976 · Italy 1980 · France 1984 · West Germany 1988 · Sweden 1992 · England 1996 · Belgium/Netherlands 2000 · Portugal 2004 · Austria/Switzerland 2008 · Poland/Ukraine 2012 · France 2016 · Pan-European 2020 · Germany 2024
Finals
1960 · 1964 · 1968 · 1972 · 1976 · 1980 · 1984 · 1988 · 1992 · 1996 · 2000 · 2004 · 2008 · 2012 · 2016 · 2020
Qualification
1960 · 1964 · 1968 · 1972 · 1976 · 1980 · 1984 · 1988 · 1992 · 1996 · 2000 · 2004 · 2008 · 2012 · 2016 · 2020 ·
Squads
1960 · 1964 · 1968 · 1972 · 1976 · 1980 · 1984 · 1988 · 1992 · 1996 · 2000 · 2004 · 2008 · 2012 · 2016 · 2020 ·
Other
Video games
National football teams of Europe (UEFA)

Albania · Andorra · Armenia · Austria · Azerbaijan · Belarus · Belgium · Bosnia and Herzegovina · Bulgaria · Croatia · Cyprus · Czech Republic · Denmark · England · Estonia · Faroe Islands · Finland · France · Georgia · Germany · Gibraltar · Greece · Hungary · Iceland · Republic of Ireland · Israel · Italy · Kazakhstan · Kosovo · Latvia · Liechtenstein · Lithuania · Luxembourg · Malta · Moldova · Montenegro · Netherlands · North Macedonia · Northern Ireland · Norway · Poland · Portugal · Romania · Russia · San Marino · Scotland · Serbia · Slovakia · Slovenia · Spain · Sweden · Switzerland · Turkey · Ukraine · Wales

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.