Patrice Evra
ManUnited P. Evra 001.png
Personal information
Full name Patrice Latyr Evra
Date of birth 15 May 1981 (1981-05-15) (age 39)
Place of birth    Dakar, Flag of Senegal Senegal
Height 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Left-back
Youth clubs
1992–1993
1993–1997
1997–1998
Flag of France CO Les Ulis
Flag of France CSF Brétigny
Flag of France Paris Saint-Germain
Senior clubs
Years Club App (Gls)
1998–1999
1999–2000
2000–2002
2002–2006
2006–2014
2014–2017
2017
2018
Total
Flag of Italy Marsala
Flag of Italy Monza
Flag of France Nice
Flag of Monaco AS Monaco
Flag of England Manchester United
Flag of Italy Juventus
Flag of France Marseille
Flag of England West Ham United
24 00(3)
000(0)
40 00(1)
120 0(2)
273 0(7)
53 00(2)
000(0)
000(0)
533 0(17)   
National team
2002–2003
2004–2016
Flag of France France U-21
Flag of France France
11 00(0)
81 00(0)

Patrice Latyr Evra (born 15 May 1981) is a French international footballer. Originally an attacker, he primarily plays as a left-back. Evra, whom Sir Alex Ferguson praised for his leadership, has served as captain for both Manchester United and France.

The son of a diplomat, Evra was born in Senegal and arrived in Europe when he was a year old. He was raised in France and began his football career playing for various clubs in the Île-de-France region such as hometown club CO Les Ulis and CSF Brétigny. In 1997, he had a stint at professional club Paris Saint-Germain. A year later, Evra seized his first footballing opportunity in neighbouring Italy when he signed his first professional contract with Marsala in Sicily. He made his professional debut with the club and, in the ensuing season, joined Monza. After a year playing with Monza, Evra returned to France to play for Nice. Originally a midfielder, while playing at Nice, he was converted into a full-back. In 2002, Evra moved to Monégasque club Monaco and contributed to the team that won the Coupe de la Ligue in 2003. He also featured in European competition for the first time in his career and, in the 2003–04 season, was the starting left-back on the Monaco team that reached the 2004 UEFA Champions League Final. In that same season domestically, Evra was named the National Union of Professional Footballers (UNFP) Ligue 1 Young Player of the Year. He was also named to the organisation's Ligue 1 Team of the Year.

Evra's performances with Monaco culminated into a move to English club Manchester United in January 2006. While playing for Manchester United, Evra has won a slew of trophies, which included winning the Football League Cup in his debut season at the club. In his second season, he eclipsed compatriot Mikaël Silvestre and Gabriel Heinze as first-choice left-back and has since won five Premier League titles, one UEFA Champions League title, one FIFA Club World Cup, three League Cups, and four Community Shield titles. Evra has been named to the Professional Footballers' Association (PFA) Team of the Year on three occasions. For his performances during the 2008–09 season, he was named to both the FIFPro World XI and the UEFA Team of the Year.

Evra is also a France international. Prior to playing at senior level, he played at under-21 level. He made his senior international debut in August 2004 in a friendly match against Bosnia and Herzegovina. Evra has participated in three major international tournaments for France; the 2008 and 2012 editions of the UEFA European Football Championship and the 2010 FIFA World Cup. In the first competition, he appeared in two group stage matches. Ahead of the 2010 World Cup, Evra was named captain of the national team by Domenech and bore the armband for the first time in the team's friendly match against Costa Rica in May 2010. At the tournament, France endured a disastrous campaign which saw the players go on strike. The incident resulted in Evra, for his role as captain, being suspended from national team duty for five matches."

Honours

Club

Monaco
Manchester United

Individual

External links

Juventus-2017-new-logo.png
Juventus F.C. squad - 2020–21

1 Szczęsny · 2 De Sciglio · 3 Chiellini (c) · 4 De Ligt · 5 Arthur · 6 Khedira · 7 Ronaldo · 8 Ramsey · 9 Morata · 10 Dybala · 11 Douglas Costa · 12 Alex Sandro · 13 Danilo · 14 McKennie · 16 Cuadrado · 19 Bonucci · 25 Rabiot · 28 Demiral · 30 Bentancur · 31 Pinsoglio · 33 Bernardeschi · 44 Kulusevski · 77 Buffon ·

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Flag of France France
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France – UEFA Euro 2008

1. Mandanda 2. Boumsong 3. Abidal 4. Vieira 5. Gallas 6. Makélélé 7. Malouda 8. Anelka 9. Benzema 10. Govou 11. Nasri 12. Henry 13. Evra 14. Clerc 15. Thuram 16. Frey 17. Squillaci 18. Gomis 19. Sagnol 20. Toulalan 21. Diarra 22. Ribéry 23. Coupet

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France – 2010 FIFA World Cup

1. Lloris 2. Sagna 3. Abidal 4. Réveillère 5. Gallas 6. Planus 7. Ribéry 8. Gourcuff 9. Cissé 10. Govou 11. Gignac 12. Henry 13. Evra 14. Toulalan 15. Malouda 16. Mandanda 17. Squillaci 18. Diarra 19. Diaby 20. Valbuena 21. Anelka 22. Clichy 23. Carrasso

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France – UEFA Euro 2012

1. Lloris (c) 2. Debuchy 3. Evra 4. Rami 5. Mexès 6. Cabaye 7. Ribéry 8. Valbuena 9. Giroud 10. Benzema 11. Nasri 12. Matuidi 13. Réveillère 14. Ménez 15. Malouda 16. Mandanda 17. M'Vila 18. Diarra 19. Martin 20. Ben Arfa 21. Koscielny 22. Clichy 23. Carrasso

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France – 2014 FIFA World Cup – Quarter-finals

1. Lloris (c) 2. Debuchy 3. Evra 4. Varane 5. Sakho 6. Cabaye 7. Cabella 8.  Valbuena 9. Giroud 10. Benzema 11. Griezmann 12. Mavuba 13. Mangala 14. Matuidi 15. Sagna 16. Ruffier 17. Digne 18. Sissoko 19. Pogba 20. Rémy 21. Koscielny 22. Schneiderlin 23. Landreau

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France – UEFA Euro 2016 – Runners-up

1. Lloris 2. Jallet 3. Evra 4. Rami 5. Kanté 6. Cabaye 7. Griezmann 8. Payet 9. Giroud 10. Gignac 11. Martial 12. Schneiderlin 13. Mangala 14. Matuidi 15. Pogba 16. Mandanda 17. Digne 18. Sissoko 19. Sagna 20. Coman 21. Koscielny 22. Umtiti 23. Costil

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