FANDOM


FIFA Women's World Cup
Founded 1991
Region Worldwide
Tournament information
Current champions Flag of the United States.png United States (3rd title)
Number of teams 24 (finals)
Most successful club Flag of the United States.png United States (3 titles)
Football current event Current
Website Official website

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991.

History

Before the formation of FIFA Women's World Cup, several unofficial women's football tournaments had been held. In 1970, the first unofficial Women's World Cup was held in Italy. The tournament continued in 1971, this time hosted by Mexico. Both of the tournaments were won by Denmark. The tournament was succeeded by the series of Mundialito tournaments throughout the 1980s in Italy.

In 1988, FIFA organized an invitational tournament in China as a test to see if global Women's World Cup was feasible. Twelve teams took part in this tournament. The tournament saw Norway as the champions after they beat Sweden in the final. The tournament was deemed a success and FIFA approved the establishment of an official World Cup, which would take place in 1991 again in China.

12 teams competed in this first ever official Women's World Cup. Six female referees or assistant referees were appointed among match officials for the first time in FIFA history. The United States claimed the first-ever Women's World Cup title, beating Norway 2–1 in the final, which took place at Guangzhou's Tianhe Stadium.

The next edition of Women's World Cup was held in 1995 in Sweden. FIFA experimented with the time-out concept for the first time at this Women's World Cup. The provisional rule allowed each team to call one two-minute break per half, but only about one in three such breaks were actually taken. Norway beat Germany in the final to clinch the Women's World Cup trophy. The final was refereed by Ingrid Jonsson from Sweden, the first women to referee a FIFA final match.

In the 1999 edition, one of the most famous moments of the tournament was American defender Brandi Chastain's victory celebration after scoring the Cup-winning penalty kick against China. She took off her jersey and waved it over her head (as men frequently do), showing her muscular torso and sports bra as she celebrated. The 1999 final in the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California had an attendance of 90,185, a world record for a women's sporting event.

Format

The final tournament has featured between twelve and twenty-four national teams competing over about one month in the host nation(s). There are two stages: the group stage followed by the knockout stage.

In the group stage, teams are drawn into groups of four teams each. Each group plays a round-robin tournament, in which each team is scheduled for three matches against other teams in the same group. The last round of matches of each group is scheduled at the same time to preserve fairness among all four teams. The two teams finishing first and second in each group and the four best teams among those ranked third qualify for the round of 16, also called the knockout stage. Points are used to rank the teams within a group, three points have been awarded for a win, one for a draw and none for a loss.

The knockout stage is a single-elimination tournament in which teams play each other in one-off matches, with extra time and penalty shootouts used to decide the winner if necessary. It begins with the round of 16. This is followed by the quarter-finals, semi-finals, the third-place match (contested by the losing semi-finalists), and the final.

Hosts and results

# Year Hosts Champions Score Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place No. of Teams
1 1991
Details
 Flag of the People's Republic of China.png China Flag of the United States.png
United States
2–1 Flag of Norway.png
Norway
Flag of Sweden Good one.jpg
Sweden
4–0 Germany.png
Germany
12
2 1995
Details
 Flag of Sweden Good one.jpg Sweden Flag of Norway.png
Norway
2–0 Germany.png
Germany
Flag of the United States.png
United States
2–0 Flag of the People's Republic of China.png
China
12
3 1999
Details
 Flag of the United States.png United States Flag of the United States.png
United States
0–0 (a.e.t.)
(5–4 p)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.png
China
Brazil.png
Brazil
0–0[A]
(5–4 p)
Flag of Norway.png
Norway
16
4 2003
Details
 Flag of the United States.png United States Germany.png
Germany
2–1 (a.e.t.) Flag of Sweden Good one.jpg
Sweden
Flag of the United States.png
United States
3–1 Flag of Canada.png
Canada
16
5 2007
Details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.png China Germany.png
Germany
2–0 Brazil.png
Brazil
Flag of the United States.png
United States
4–1 Flag of Norway.png
Norway
16
6 2011
Details
 Germany.png Germany Flag of Japan.png
Japan
2–2 (a.e.t.)
(3–1 p)
Flag of the United States.png
United States
Flag of Sweden Good one.jpg
Sweden
2–1 Flag of France.png
France
16
7 2015
Details
 Flag of Canada.png Canada Flag of the United States.png
United States
5–2 Flag of Japan.png
Japan
England.png
England
1–0 (a.e.t.) Germany.png
Germany
24
8 2019
Details
 Flag of France.png France 24

A No extra time was played.

Teams reaching the top four

# Team Titles Runners-up Third Place Fourth Place Total
1 Flag of the United States.png United States 3 (1991, 1999, 2015) 1 (2011) 3 (1995, 2003, 2007) 7
2 Germany.png Germany 2 (2003, 2007) 1 (1995) 2 (1991, 2015)5
3 Flag of Norway.png Norway 1 (1995) 1 (1991) 2 (1999, 2007)4
4 Flag of Japan.png Japan 1 (2011) 1 (2015) 2
5 Flag of Sweden Good one.jpg Sweden 1 (2003) 2 (1991, 2011) 3
6 Brazil.png Brazil 1 (2007) 1 (1999) 2
7 Flag of the People's Republic of China.png China 1 (1999) 1 (1995)2
8 England.png England 1 (2015) 1
9 Flag of Canada.gif Canada 1 (2003)1
Flag of France.png France 1 (2011)1

External links

FIFA Women's World Cup
Tournaments

China 1991 · Sweden 1995 · United States 1999 · United States 2003 · China 2007 · Germany 2011 · Canada 2015 · France 2019 · TBD 2023

Qualification

1991 · 1995 · 1999 · 2003 · 2007 · 2011 · 2015 · 2019

Finals

1991 · 1995 · 1999 · 2003 · 2007 · 2011 · 2015 · 2019

Squads

1991 · 1995 · 1999 · 2003 · 2007 · 2011 · 2015 · 2019

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.