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Didier Deschamps
France D. Deschamps 001
Personal information
Full name Didier Claude Deschamps
Date of birth 15 October 1968 (1968-10-15) (age 51)
Place of birth    Bayonne, Flag of France France
Height 1.74 m (5 ft 9 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current club Flag of France France (Manager)
Youth clubs
1976-1983
1983-1985
Flag of France Bayonne
Flag of France Nantes
Senior clubs
Years Club App (Gls)
1985-1989
1989-1994
1990-1991
1994-1999
1999-2000
2000-2001
Total
Flag of France Nantes
Flag of France Marseille
Flag of FranceBordeaux (loan)
Flag of Italy Juventus
England Chelsea
Flag of Spain Valencia
111 (4)
123 (6)
29 (3)
124 (4)
27 (0)
13 (0)
427 (17)   
National team
1988-1989
1989-2000
Flag of France France U21
Flag of France France
34 (2)
13 (0)
Teams managed
2001-2005
2006-2007
2009-2012
2012-
Flag of Monaco Monaco
Flag of Italy Juventus
Flag of France Marseille
Flag of France France

Didier Claude Deschamps (born 15 October 1968) is a retired French footballer and current manager of the France national football team. He played as a defensive midfielder for several clubs, in France, Italy, England, and Spain, such as Marseille, Juventus, Chelsea and Valencia, as well as Nantes and Bordeaux. Nicknamed "the water-carrier" by former France team-mate Eric Cantona, Deschamps was an intelligent and hard-working defensive midfielder who excelled at winning back possession and subsequently starting attacking plays, and also stood out for his leadership throughout his career. As a French international, he was capped on 103 occasions and took part at three UEFA European Football Championships and one FIFA World Cup, captaining his nation to victories in the 1998 World Cup and Euro 2000.

In addition to winning two French league titles in 1991 and 1992, Deschamps was part of the Marseille squad that became the first, and so far only, French club to win the Champions League, a feat which the team achieved in 1993; with the Champions League victory, Deschamps became the youngest captain ever to lead his team to win the title. With Juventus he played three Champions League finals in a row between 1996 and 1998, winning the title in 1996. With the Turin side, he also won the UEFA Super Cup and the Intercontinental Cup, as well as three Serie A titles, among other trophies. With Chelsea, he won the 1999–2000 FA Cup, and also reached another Champions League final with Valencia in 2001, before retiring later that season. After Franz Beckenbauer and followed by Iker Casillas, he was only the second captain in the history of football to have lifted the Champions League trophy, the World Cup trophy, and the European Championship trophy.

As a manager, Deschamps began his career with Monaco, and helped the club to win the Coupe de la Ligue and 2003, and reached the 2004 UEFA Champions League Final, being named Ligue 1 Manager of the Year in 2004. During the 2006–07 season, he helped his former club Juventus win the Serie B title and return to Serie A following their relegation due to their involvement in the 2006 Calciopoli Scandal the previous season. He subsequently managed another one of his former clubs, Marseille, where he won the Ligue 1 title during the 2009–10 season, as well as three consecutive Coupe de la Ligue titles between 2010 and 2012, and consecutive Trophée des Champions titles in 2010 and 2011. On 8 July 2012, Deschamps was named as the new manager of the French national team, leading the team to the quarter-finals of the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the final of UEFA Euro 2016.

Honours

Player

Marseille
Juventus
Chelsea
Valencia
France

Manager

Monaco
Juventus
Marseille
France

Individual

Player
  • French Division 1 Rookie of the Year: 1989
  • French Player of the Year: 1996
  • UEFA Euro Team of the Tournament: 1996
  • FIFA 100: 2004
  • The Dream Team 110 years of OM: 2010
Manager
  • Ligue 1 Manager of the Year: 2004

Orders

  • Chevalier (Knight) of the Légion d'honneur in 1998

Records

External links

Template:AS Monaco FC managers

Juventus Football Club - Managers

Károly 1923 to 26 • Viola 1926 to 28 • Aitken 1928 to 30 • Carcano 1930 to 35 • Bigatto 1935 • Rosetta 1935 to 39 • Caligaris 1939 to 41 • Munerati 1941 • Ferrari 1941 to 42 • Monti 1942 • Borel 1942 to 46 • Cesarini 1946 to 48 • Chalmers 1948 to 49 • Carver 1949 to 51 • Bertolini 1951 • Sárosi 1951 to 53 • Olivieri 1953 to 55 • Puppo 1955 to 57 • Broćić 1957 to 59 • Depetrini 1959 • Cesarini 1959 to 61 • Parola 1961 • Gren & Korostelev 1961 • Parola 1961 to 62 • Amaral 1962 to 64 • Monzeglio 1964 • Herrera 1964 to 69 • Carniglia 1969 to 70 • Rabitti 1970 • Picchi 1970 to 71 • Vycpálek 1971 to 74 • Parola 1974 to 76 • Trapattoni 1976 to 86 • Marchesi 1986 to 88 • Zoff 1988 to 90 • Maifredi 1990 to 91 • Trapattoni 1991 to 94 • Lippi 1994 to 99 • Ancelotti 1999 to 2001 • Lippi 2001 to 04 • Capello 2004 to 06 • Deschamps 2006 to 07 • Corradini 2007 • Ranieri 2007 to 09 • Ferrara 2009 to 10 • Zaccheroni 2010 • Delneri 2010 to 11 • Conte 2011 to 14 • Allegri 2014 to 19 • Sarri 2019–

Template:Olympique de Marseille managers

France+Logo clipped rev 1
Flag of France France
France+Logo clipped rev 1
FIFA World Cup winning captain

1930: Nasazzi · 1934: Combi · 1938: Meazza · 1950: Varela · 1954: Walter · 1958: Bellini · 1962: Mauro · 1966: Moore · 1970: C. Alberto · 1974: Beckenbauer · 1978: Passarella · 1982: Zoff · 1986: Maradona · 1990: Matthäus · 1994: Dunga · 1998: Deschamps · 2002: Cafu · 2006: Cannavaro · 2010: Casillas · 2014: Lahm · 2018: Lloris ·

FIFA World Cup winning managers

1930: Suppici · 1934: Pozzo · 1938: Pozzo · 1950: López Fontana · 1954: Herberger · 1958: Feola · 1962: Moreira · 1966: Ramsey · 1970: Zagallo · 1974: Schön · 1978: Menotti · 1982: Bearzot · 1986: Bilardo · 1990: Beckenbauer · 1994: Parreira · 1998: Jacquet · 2002: Scolari · 2006: Lippi · 2010: Del Bosque · 2014: Löw · 2018: Deschamps ·

Template:France national football team managers

France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – UEFA Euro 1992

1. Martini 2. Amoros 3. Silvestre 4. Petit 5. Blanc 6. Casoni 7. Deschamps 8. Sauzée 9. Papin 10. Fernández 11. Perez 12. Cocard 13. Boli 14. Durand 15. Divert 16. Vahirua 17. Garde 18. Cantona 19. Rousset 20. Angloma

France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – UEFA Euro 1996

1. Lama 2. Angloma 3. Di Meco 4. Leboeuf 5. Blanc 6. Guérin 7. Deschamps 8. Desailly 9. Djorkaeff 10. Zidane 11. Loko 12. Lizarazu 13. Dugarry 14. Lamouchi 15. Thuram 16. Barthez 17. Madar 18. Pedros 19. Karembeu 20. Roche 21. Martins 22. Martini

France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – 1998 FIFA World Cup

1. Lama 2. Candela 3. Lizarazu 4. Vieira 5. Blanc 6. Djorkaeff 7. Deschamps (c) 8. Desailly 9. Guivarc'h 10. Zidane 11. Pires 12. Henry 13. Diomède 14. Boghossian 15. Thuram 16. Barthez 17. Petit 18. Leboeuf 19. Karembeu 20. Trezeguet 21. Dugarry 22. Charbonnier

France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – UEFA Euro 2000

1. Lama 2. Candela 3. Lizarazu 4. Vieira 5. Blanc 6. Djorkaeff 7. Deschamps 8. Desailly 9. Anelka 10. Zidane 11. Pirès 12. Henry 13. Wiltord 14. Micoud 15. Thuram 16. Barthez 17. Petit 18. Leboeuf 19. Karembeu 20. Trezeguet 21. Dugarry 22. Ramé

France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – 2014 FIFA World Cup – Quarter-finals

1. Lloris (c) 2. Debuchy 3. Evra 4. Varane 5. Sakho 6. Cabaye 7. Cabella 8.  Valbuena 9. Giroud 10. Benzema 11. Griezmann 12. Mavuba 13. Mangala 14. Matuidi 15. Sagna 16. Ruffier 17. Digne 18. Sissoko 19. Pogba 20. Rémy 21. Koscielny 22. Schneiderlin 23. Landreau

  • Manager: Flag of France Didier Deschamps
France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – UEFA Euro 2016 – Runners-up

1. Lloris 2. Jallet 3. Evra 4. Rami 5. Kanté 6. Cabaye 7. Griezmann 8. Payet 9. Giroud 10. Gignac 11. Martial 12. Schneiderlin 13. Mangala 14. Matuidi 15. Pogba 16. Mandanda 17. Digne 18. Sissoko 19. Sagna 20. Coman 21. Koscielny 22. Umtiti 23. Costil

  • Manager: Flag of France Didier Deschamps
France+Logo clipped rev 1
France – 2018 FIFA World Cup – Winners

1. Lloris (c) 2. Pavard 3. Kimpembe 4. Varane 5. Umtiti 6. Pogba 7. Griezmann 8. Lemar 9. Giroud 10. Mbappé 11. Dembélé 12. Tolisso 13. Kanté 14. Matuidi 15. Nzonzi 16. Mandanda 17. Rami 18. Fekir 19. Sidibé 20. Thauvin 21. Hernández 22. Mendy 23. Areola

  • Manager: Flag of France Didier Deschamps

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